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Carl Zimmer interviewed here on how he received his genome on a hard drive and what he did with it

“Once upon a time, there was just one human genome and it took hundreds of people many years to read it… and it cost maybe around 3 billion [dollars].” Many years and a few thousand dollars later, Zimmer can hold his genome on a drive in the palm of his hand.

Gene Editing on Last Week Tonight with John Oliver

Scientists are developing new ways to alter the genetic code of living organisms. John Oliver explores the risks, rewards, and wolf-related hazards of gene editing.
Warning: Contains language not suitable for small children

Ellen Jorgensen explains the basics of CRISPR

Should we bring back the wooly mammoth? Or edit a human embryo? Or wipe out an entire species that we consider harmful? The genome-editing technology CRISPR has made extraordinary questions like these legitimate - but how does it work?
See Ellen Jorgensen in person at the GWG 2018 conference

Kurzgesagt (In a Nutshell) Covers the topic of GMOs

Are GMOs bad for your health? Or is this fear unfounded? Learn about the concerns and benefits of GMOs.

Nature explains the uses of the CRISPR-Cas9 System

The CRISPR-Cas9 system has revolutionised gene-editing, but cutting DNA isn't all it can do. From turning gene expression on and off to fluorescently tagging particular sequences, this animation explores some of the exciting possibilities of CRISPR.

Articles

Consumers soften to genetically engineered foods after addition of labels
Nature reports that results in Vermont suggest mandatory labelling improves reputation of GE foods.

Art

Fellman Studio
Lynn Fellman, a multimedia artist, designer, and writer. Fellman communicates the beauty and value of genomic science. From evolutionary genetics to precision medicine, her creative approach makes you smarter and curious to know more.

chid0
chid0 began got a graphic design degree in Vienna and designed postage stamps along with taking on some freelance illustration jobs here and there... only to ditch everything to become a genetic engineer instead. Now, she lives in Prague, working on her PhD at MPI Dresden, and creates transgenic mice and planarians instead of postage stamps.

Other

Redesigning Life on Earth

Bill and Melinda Gates are messing with nature. But they’re doing it to save the world. This week, their foundation gave away millions to make malaria-carrying mosquitoes extinct before long. On the way, they’ll have to tweak some DNA. Vox’s Joss Fong explains.

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